Doctor Who returned to UK screens this week. Sadly, Billie Piper and her sweet pear shaped posterior departed with the last season.

Freema is now stepping into Tardis light to take over. Does she have a bottom worthy of replacing Billie?

The bad news is first episode didn’t give us much of a look at it. From what I can see though I think Ghetto Booty lovers won’t be disappointed. However, not to my tastes at all. Billie’s bum wasn’t slim, but I do like that pear shape.

I’m not a fan of Doctor Who. As a child in the UK I did enjoy it, however when I looked back at some of the shows I loved at age eight they were pretty slow, horrifically overacted, and of course the monsters were patently obviously made of rubber.

Thus it was a while before I bothered to watch the new show – the addition of Billie certainly helped. It’s ok actually, vastly improved on the original, but still very much a children’s show.

They obviously have a much larger budget than the original, so I guess that helps. However, as is often the case with UK TV, and I’ve touched on this before – the talent just isn’t there in the production crew.

For example, in this debut episode of Freema much of the action is shot in a hospital. Now, I don’t know if you’ve ever tried to film in a hospital. Speaking from experience it’s actually very hard to do – the lighting is an absolute nightmare to get balanced and even. It’s neither sound friendly nor are the spaces always conducive to free movement. All of these problems are blatantly obvious in this episode.

Either you have to throw money at the solution, fake the hospital environment on a set or better location, or be very creative with production design, lighting and editing. The last is the cheapest and by far the best solution, but it requires talent. The Doctor Who people did none of the above.

A US production company would pay attention to details like that – it is what makes a good show great. A UK one says, yeah, fine, leave it, it’ll do…

Mediocrity awaits… The BBC is publicly funded and the success of shows is not as important as in the US. The competitive edge – or lack thereof – sticks out like a sore thumb in the UK.

Billie can be found HERE